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How can Parents Cope with a Child having Retinoblastoma?

How can Parents Cope with a Child having Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma is the most common visual cancer in children. Data says it affects around 300 children in the U.S. every year. The disease can be inherited and it can affect one eye or both eyes. The usual symptoms are altered discoloration of the pupil and strabismus that leads to medical attention. Succeeding appropriate diagnostic studies and care provided by a multidisciplinary team, including an...

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Neonatal and Infant Screening as a Fundamental Procedure

Neonatal and Infant Screening as a Fundamental Procedure

Pediatric Care plays a vital role in the life of our children. Part of pediatric care is first Neonatal then Infant Screening. This should be done from age zero of a child so as to thoroughly detect abnormalities not only in the physical but genetic diseases as well. Through these procedures or tests, early detection of a child’s deficiencies can help prevent deformities and...

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Understanding Pediatric Retinoblastoma

Understanding Pediatric Retinoblastoma

Pediatric retinoblastoma is an eye cancer that affects children which may cause blindness or death. Pediatric retinoblastoma malpractice occurs when a doctor’s negligence, whether by misdiagnosis of the condition, delayed diagnosis, or improper treatment, causes injury to the patient. If you or a loved one have suffered injury, or even death, due to pediatric retinoblastoma, call Dellecker, Wilson, King, McKenna, Ruffier & Sos, LLP...

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Pediatric Retinoblastoma Malpractice

Pediatric Retinoblastoma Malpractice

Pediatric retinoblastoma is an eye cancer that affects children. It may cause blindness or death. It is important for families of young children to be aware of its warning signs. Pediatric retinoblastoma malpractice occurs when a doctor’s negligence, whether by misdiagnosis of the condition, delayed diagnosis, or improper treatment, causes injury to the patient. If you or a loved one suffered injury or death...

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Breakthroughs in Retinoblastoma Research May Lead to Better Cancer Treatments

Breakthroughs in Retinoblastoma Research May Lead to Better Cancer Treatments

Pediatric retinoblastoma has been central to cancer research because it develops specifically in response to the loss or change of just one gene. When the single gene associated with retinoblastoma – RB1 – is not working as usual, cone cells in the retina can basically multiply without regulation. Now it’s been found that the oncogene MDM2 can also be instrumental in cell proliferation. This...

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Treating Retinoblastoma at Pediatric Cancer Centers

Treating Retinoblastoma at Pediatric Cancer Centers

Pediatric retinoblastoma is a rare form of kids’ eye cancer that can be life threatening if it’s not treated quickly enough. Like all forms of child cancer, retinoblastoma is typically treated in specialized pediatric cancer centers. These cancer centers may stand alone or be part of large hospitals. Pediatric cancer centers offer a wealth of support for patients and their families, in addition to...

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New Hope for Detecting Retinoblastoma in Low-Income Families

New Hope for Detecting Retinoblastoma in Low-Income Families

When it comes to detecting eye issues such as pediatric retinoblastoma early, low income children tend to be at a disadvantage compared to children born into affluence. The disparity between affluent children and low income children born in underdeveloped countries is even worse. Fortunately, an innovative app is helping to detect the rare cancer – as well as other eye conditions – and saving...

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What If Enucleation Is Necessary to Treat Retinoblastoma?

What If Enucleation Is Necessary to Treat Retinoblastoma?

Pediatric retinoblastoma is a highly curable form of children’s cancer, but sometimes the eye cannot be saved. If your doctor recommends removing the eye to treat retinoblastoma, here are a few things that you should know about the procedure, your child’s vision, available prosthetics, and life after enucleation.   When Enucleation Is Necessary While no one wants to hear that their child will be...

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A Look into Children’s Eye Development

A Look into Children’s Eye Development

There may not be a more special moment for new parents than the very first time that their baby looks up, locks eyes with their parent, and smiles. It’s the kind of moment that stays with parents for the rest of their lives, and the kind of moment that they wish and hope that their children are able to experience for themselves when they...

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Pediatric Retinoblastoma: How Screening Saves Lives

Pediatric Retinoblastoma: How Screening Saves Lives

For little Parker Abbott, a 20 month old infant from Waxahachie, Texas, life has already been filled with tremendous challenges. Parker suffers from bilateral retinoblastoma, a rare form of cancer that forms in children’s eyes. There are approximately 700 cases reported annually, with around a quarter of them being bilateral, which means that cancer forms on both retinas. The majority of these cases form...

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